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Archive for May, 2014


Melbourne Storm struggling to keep star forwards…

NRL Rd 8 - Storm v Warriors

 

MELBOURNE Storm expect to lose one of their off-contract forward stars – Kevin Proctor and Ryan Hoffman – and have set themselves the challenge of making sure they don’t lose both.

There is massive interest in both. Proctor has been linked to offers from Sydney Roosters, St George Illawarra, the Warriors and Canberra. The Warriors are also understood to be among the clubs in for Hoffman – they are obviously determined to get at least one of the pair.

The Storm have invested a lot of their salary cap into the ‘big three’ players – Billy Slater, Cooper Cronk and Cameron Smith – for several years into the future and are finding it increasingly difficult to fend off offers for players they want to keep.

Melbourne lost five-eighth Gareth Widdop to St George Illawarra at the end of last season.

NRL Rd 7 - Raiders v Storm

Rugby League Week has learned the club would have to rely on Proctor and Hoffman each being prepared to stay for much less money than they could earn elsewhere. That is highly unlikely, so Plan B is to negotiate well enough to be able to keep one of them. There is no indication whether one player is more likely to stay than the other.

Proctor and Hoffman are both involved in the representative weekend. Proctor played for the New Zealand side that was surprisingly competitive in the Test against Australia in Sydney on Friday night and Hoffman is the City captain for Sunday’s game against Country in Dubbo.

Acknowledgements:  – GREG PRICHARD

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Welcome to the Amazon…

English: Amazonian rainforest, upper Amazon ba...

English: Amazonian rainforest, upper Amazon basin, Loreto region, Peru

 
 
Are GMO Foods Safe? – www.alsearsmd.com/GMOfoods – Dr. Sears Reveals the Shocking Truth About GMO Seeds and Food.

WWF newsletter@wwf.panda.org via mail45.wdc03.rsgsv.net

4:09 AM (15 hours ago)

Play your part in saving the Amazon, wherever you are.
 
The Amazon rainforest is one of the most biodiverse places on Earth and is under threat. We’ve been working in the Amazon for 40 years to protect the forests, species and people that call it home – you too can help!
Here are some quick facts about some of the unique species found there:
• Hummmm… did you know that a hummingbird’s heart rate is more than 1,200 beats per minute? That’s an amazing amount!
• The Amazon is a bird’s paradise: most macaws stay with the same mate their whole lives – that’s commitment!
• Do you know what ‘jaguar’ means? The name of these gorgeous animals comes from the indigenous word yaguar, which means ‘he who kills with one leap’.
Save the Amazon, wherever you are!
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Welcome to the Amazon…

English: Amazonian rainforest, upper Amazon ba...

English: Amazonian rainforest, upper Amazon basin, Loreto region, Peru

 
 
Why this ad?
Are GMO Foods Safe? – www.alsearsmd.com/GMOfoods – Dr. Sears Reveals the Shocking Truth About GMO Seeds and Food.

WWF newsletter@wwf.panda.org via mail45.wdc03.rsgsv.net

4:09 AM (15 hours ago)

to me
Play your part in saving the Amazon, wherever you are.
View this email in your browser
The Amazon rainforest is one of the most biodiverse places on Earth and is under threat. We’ve been working in the Amazon for 40 years to protect the forests, species and people that call it home – you too can help!
Here are some quick facts about some of the unique species found there:
• Hummmm… did you know that a hummingbird’s heart rate is more than 1,200 beats per minute? That’s an amazing amount!
• The Amazon is a bird’s paradise: most macaws stay with the same mate their whole lives – that’s commitment!
• Do you know what ‘jaguar’ means? The name of these gorgeous animals comes from the indigenous word yaguar, which means ‘he who kills with one leap’.
Save the Amazon, wherever you are!

 

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Can I keep the money?

irish millionaire

So very true indeed…

The sound of your laughter…

 

The Sound of Your Laughter
I love the way you laugh.
Like a peal of handbells
With perfect pitch.
Or the sonorous belly laugh of a wind chime.
And when you laugh until you weep,
So that fat tears, good tears,
Drench your cheeks,
And you shake uncontrollably
With the joy of it.
What about when you are faced with the ridiculous?
So that your laughs scatter
Like gunshots of rapid rifle fire?
And those low chuckles that seem to start
Somewhere near your toes?
Your laughter is medicine, a sunburst, a holiday,
Infectious, inclusive, individual,
As are you.
I just love the way you laugh.Link: The Sound of Your Laughter http://wp.me/p2PESe-2H2 via @caronessauthor

1

 

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Amazon rainforest…

Amazon Rainforest

Amazon Rainforest (Photo credit: CIFOR)

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© WWF-Canon / Roger LeGUEN

Wonder trees and plants on the world’s poorest soils

Within the Amazon rainforest itself, several types of forests are found: some are dense, jungle-like rainforests, others are open forests with palms and some are open forests with plenty of lianas1.
But they all share one common characteristic: abundant rainfall. Over the course of one year, a patch of rainforest will receive between 1,500 mm and 3,000 mm of rainfall2. This creates the typical tropical atmosphere of a rainforest with average temperature hovering around 24 °C or more3.

The paradox of rainforest soils

Tropical soils are notoriously thin and poor in nutrients. In some parts of the Amazon River Basin, white, sandy soils are found, which have evolved through erosion over hundreds of millions of years. And yet, although these soils have lost their mineral content and fertility, rich rainforests grow on them.

In rainforests, some of the highest trees on the planet shoot to the sky. Dead plants and animals quickly decompose and their organic matter is utilized by other organisms.

Efficient recycling of dead matter

Fungi and bacteria, small but vital actors of the rainforest food web – convert dead organic matter into compounds that become available to the roots of plants. In this task they are assisted by a range of other organisms that obligingly perform key functions in processing organic matter.

Life in the canopy

Treetops form a vast canopy characterized by high productivity: More sunlight is captured there by leaf area than in any other ecosystem in the world.

This light is converted by plants into energy matter through a process rainforests perform at a rate that is unrivalled by any other ecosystem: photosynthesis.

Underneath the vibrant canopy, light is scarce and because of that, growth is limited. In some places however, light does come through, such as in the forest gaps, which can be created by falling trees.

Green energy machines

Rainforests are the most productive ecosystems on Earth, using the energy they generate for self-maintenance, reproduction and new growth.

Coupled with a climate that is constant and warm, and with almost continued availability of water and light, there are few obstacles to sustaining this productivity throughout the year.

The exception to this is the occasionally severe climatic effects and the destructive interventions of people.

The rain routine

Temperature plays a significant role in the daily routine of the rainforest. As the temperature rises, plants lose water to the atmosphere through evaporation, forming clouds, and eventually rainfall, which is then soaked up by the plants again.

Rainforests are clearly dynamic, but sensitive ecosystems, subject to disturbing factors that may not be that obvious. For example, despite rainforests’ ‘wet’ appearance and intense humidity (around 100%), there is evidence in their soils that in the past one thousand years, they have been affected by fires, occurring during periods of prolonged dryness.4

Conversion of rainforests to pastureland

More recent and worrying trends have been the conversion of rainforests to pastureland. This type of impact affects the rainforest in different ways, depending on the size of the deforested land used for pastures and the amount of time the rainforest takes to recover.

Studies show that heavily grazed sites remain as grassland, with few trees able to grow again. The areas that do recover somewhat, never quite match the original rainforest’s biological richness and appearance.

http:1//wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/where_we_work/amazon/about_the_amazon/ecosystems_amazon/rainforests/?utm_source=WWF+International&utm_campaign=2cb3fc7693-welcome_email_03&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_61baba9791-2cb3fc7693-29845756

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